THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS: by the late J.B.Lightfoot DD., DCL., LL.D. Lord Bishop of Durham. Edited and completed by J.R.Harmer MA. Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, sometime Chaplain to the Bishop. First published Macmillan & Co. 1891. Prepared for katapi by Paul Ingram, 2014.
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THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS

comprising
THE EPISTLES (GENUINE AND SPURIOUS) OF CLEMENT OF ROME, THE EPISTLES OF S. IGNATIUS, THE EPISTLE OF S. POLYCARP, THE MARTYRDOM OF S. POLYCARP, THE TEACHING OF THE APOSTLES, THE EPISTLE OF BARNABAS, THE SHEPHERD OF HERMAS, THE EPISTLE TO DIOGNETUS, THE FRAGMENTS OF PAPIAS, THE RELIQUES OF THE ELDERS PRESERVED IN IRENAUS.

REVISED TEXTS WITH SHORT INTRODUCTIONS AND ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS BY THE LATE J. B. LIGHTFOOT, D.D., D.C.L., LL.D., LORD BISHOP OF DURHAM, EDITED AND COMPLETED BY J. R. HARMER, M.A., fellow of corpus christi college, cambridge, sometime chaplain to the bishop.

PUBLISHED BY THE TRUSTEES OF THE LIGHTFOOT FUND.

London : MACMILLAN AND CO. AND NEW YORK. 1891


INTRODUCTORY NOTE.

THE text of the Epistles of Clement, Ignatius and Polycarp and of the Martyrdom of Polycarp is taken from Bishop Lightfoot's larger work The Apostolic Fathers, Part I. S. Clement of Rome (2 vols., Macmillan & Co., 1890); Part II. S. Ignatius, S. Polycarp (2nd edition, 3 vols., Macmillan & Co., 1889). That of the Teaching of the Apostles was revised by him for this work. Mr Harmer contributes the text of the Epistle of Barnabas, the Shepherd of Hermas, and the Epistle to Diognetus. The Fragments of Papias and the Reliques of the Elders are taken from the printed editions referred to in each case.

No attempt has been made to give any apparatus criticus; but in passages where the reading of all the Greek authorities has been set aside for that of a version or patristic quotation, or for a conjectural emendation, the fact is stated in a footnote, and the authorities given.

The introductions throughout (with the exceptions of those which deal with the text, and the short prefatory note to the Fragments of Papias) were either written by Dr Lightfoot for this work, or are derived from his larger work referred to above.

The translations of the Epistles of Clement, Ignatius, and Polycarp and of the Martyrdom of Polycarp are reprinted from the larger edition. The rest of the translations are based upon rough notes found among his papers, but in thc case of the Reliques of the Elders Keble's translation of Irenæus in the Library of Fathers of the Holy Catholic Church (Parker & Co., 1872) has been adopted with a few ,verbal alterations.

Mr Harmer alone has fulfilled the task of seeing the volume through the press, and the Trustees are indebted to him in this and in other works not only for critical skill and constant care, but also for great generosity which is not further referred to only in deference to his own firmly expressed wish. It should however be added that the Bishop himself recorded in a written memorandum 'his earnest desire that Mr Harmer's name should stand upon the title page, side by side with his own.'

It is hoped that an index of words and phrases will be published separately.

H. W. W. May 25, 1891.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

THE EPISTLES OF CLEMENT OF ROME:
The genuine epistle: Introduction | 1 Clement - : text & translation |
An ancient Homily commonly called 2 Clement: Introduction | text & translation |

THE EPISTLES OF IGNATIUS | Introduction | Epistle to the Ephesians | Magnesians | Trallians | Romans | Philadelphians | Smyrnaeans || to Polycarp |

THE EPISTLE OF S. POLYCARP | introduction | text & translation |

THE MARTYRDOM OF S. POLYCARP | introduction | text & translation |

THE DIDACHE, THE TEACHING OF THE APOSTLES | introduction | text and translation |

THE EPISTLE OF BARNABAS | introduction | text & translation |

THE SHEPHERD OF HERMAS | introduction | text & translation: 1. the visions | 2. the mandates | 3. the parables.

THE EPISTLE TO DIOGNETUS | introduction | text & translation |

THE FRAGMENTS OF PAPIAS | text & translation: I haven't included this chapter from the APOSTOLIC FATHERS. For Papias, Go to THIS page at Stephen Carlson's website, www.hypotyposeis.org.

THE RELIQUES OF THE ELDERS PRESERVED IN IRENAEUS | text & translation |

SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS EMPLOYED.
INDEX OF SCRIPTURAL PASSAGES.
MAP TO ILLUSTRATE THE EPISTLES OF S. IGNATIUS.


SYMBOL AND ABBREVIATIONS

The following symbols and abbreviations have been employed in this volume :


add. pref. Where a word (or words) is (or are) added, or prefixed, in the pref. authority subjoined.
al. Where the divergence is so great in a version that no inference can be drawn as to the reading which the author of the version had before him. This will also include passages which are so corrupt as to be worthless for determining a reading.
app. Apparently.
cf. Where an authority, or another passage in the text, may be claimed indirectly in support of a reading.
conj.
ins.
The editor whose name follows this abbreviation has conjectured,
or inserted, the reading which precedes the abbreviation.
def. When the context, in which the word or words should occur, is wanting in the MS or version stated.
dub. Where a word or expression is so translated or paraphrased that the reading which it represents is uncertain.
homœot. Where a passage has been inadvertently omitted by a scribe, because it ends with the same word which closed the preceding sentence.
illeg. Illegible.
in marg. Where an editor has stated a conjectural emendation in his notes, but has not placed it in his text.

pri. sec. tert.

Whenever the same word or expression occurs more than once in the same chapter or section, these abbreviations signify that the note refers to the first, second or third occurrence (respectively) of such word or expression.
supp. The editor whose name follows this abbreviation has filled up a lacuna in the text by supplying the word or words which precede the abbreviation.
[ ] In the Greek text or English translation, words placed between square brackets have only a modified textual authority, and are probably the result of a gloss or of a second recension. In the footnotes, an authority placed between square brackets after the name of an editor represents a version, the reading of which has helped the editor in question to emend the Greek text as specified. In the Reliques of the Elders, passages thus included may perhaps be nothing more than IrenEeus' own comments.
| | Words included within perpendicular lines are conjectural readings, inserted where there is preponderating evidence that words have fallen out of the Greek text by homceoteleuton. This symbol is only used where (as in the case of the Epistle to Diognetus and of the greater part of the Shepherd of Hermas) the Greek text is extant in a single MS.
( ) Brackets of this form include words in the English translation which have been supplied to help the sense of the passage, and are not represented in the Greek or Latin original.
⌜ ⌝ These symbols exhibit the restoration of the text of the Shepherd of Hermas, where lacunae exist in the Athos MS.
† † Corruptions in the text are indicated by daggers placed on each side of the corrupt passage.
[ ... ] katapi ed: I have also employed this symbol to indicate links to scripture references marked comp. followed by the scripture reference, in the margin of the 1891 publication of THE APOSTOLIC FATHERS, generally adjacent to the beginning of the line on which the reference occurs.

The symbols which represent the authorities for the text in any document are explained in the introduction which precedes that document.

References to patristic authorities are abbreviated as follows:


Anon-Syr. The anonymous Syriac writer of the Demonstrationes Patrum [VI or VII].
Ant. Antiochus the Monk [VII].
Clem. Alex. Clement of Alexandria [II].
ps-Ath. The anonymous author of the Doctrina ad Antiochum ducem, wrongly assigned to Athanasius.
Sev. Severus of Antioch [VI].
Tim. Timotheus of Alexandria [V].

The century in which the writer lived is given within square brackets.